I am exhilarated by creating and counterbalancing formal oppositions of line and color, form and space, light and dark, organic and architectonic, diffusion and thickening, surface and depth. I struggle to bring out the mysterious and ineffable beyond the mundane, so that my abstractions and techniques embody the individual pitted against or confronted by the overwhelming, incomprehensible immensity of the universe.

I feel a kinship with 19th-century Northern Romantic artists such as Friedrich and Turner, stirred by their sense of scale and heroic theatricality. Even when tending toward monochromatic, color is always an important part of my work: it is energy, emotion, life, and it brings joy and quickens the blood. Whatever I devise in terms of hue, saturation, and vibrancy must be met with a restraining force or structure, and I increasingly explore processes that set different qualities of color, pigment, and texture against each other, even allowing for and embracing dissonance or jolie laide (“beautiful ugly”).

I do believe that beauty affects not only how we feel but how we behave. I think we’re hardwired to appreciate beauty in music, art and literature; we can learn sophisticated ways to approach beauty, but at the most basic level I think people respond to certain constructs found in nature as reflected in aesthetic fundamentals and classic tropes. As the daughter of an artist, I imbibed the principles of art making and great art at an early age, and yet I am constantly pulled in new directions rather than staying with one style or point of view. Mediated by a desire for freedom, this tension between permanence and flux seems to always play out in my canvases — maybe even cathartically.

 

 

                                                  

Upcoming events

One more week left for show with Patty Brown at State of the Art. A great collaboration- not overdone, but I think our colorful, gestural work goes well together.
Winter Journey at CAP for the month of December

06/29/2016

Featured Artist
Memorial Day weekend- balancing work, friends and painting.

Echo Art Fair in Buffalo was a great success- sales, purchases and new friends.

Photo by Cheryl Gorski.

The month of May opens with a great group show at State of the Art Gallery in Ithaca on Friday May 6, then an open studio from 10-3 pm at the Mink Gallery, 614 North Cayuga Street.

 

One week later I'm in Buffalo for the Echo Art Fair at the OSC Manufacturing, 1001 East Delavan in Buffalo NY. The first Echo was held at the old Central Train Station on Buffalo's East Side, then moved to other locations. Now it's back in what promises to be a great setting.

It's such a privilege to have one's work viewed and thoughtfully considered by someone you've never met. Jessica Beck is the Associate Curator of Art at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, and was the judge for the BSA 120th Catalogue Show at the Castellani Museum of Art in Lewiston. I wanted to share what she wrote about this piece, "Happiness", not only because it's so generous, but because it makes me think about what I do in new ways.

 

Feeling the weight of history these days, the untimely death of Cornell's president Beth Garrett, the passing of our son Dan three years ago last month, my mother three years ago this month, my father in June of 2014- feelings of nostalgia, as much as loss, and as I age, the sense of a limited horizon. So why not put some thoughts down?

 

Looking forward to our two month long special event at State of the Art Gallery in ithaca. SOAG artists respond to a poem or poems from regional poets, invited by past Poet Laureate of Tompkins County, Tish PEARLMAN. 

Artist Statement

                                                                         
I am exhilarated by creating and counterbalancing formal oppositions of line and color, form and space, light and dark, organic and architectonic, diffusion and thickening, surface and depth. I struggle to bring out the mysterious and ineffable beyond the mundane, so that my abstractions and techniques embody the individual pitted against or confronted by the overwhelming, incomprehensible immensity of the universe.

I feel a kinship with 19th-century Northern Romantic artists such as Friedrich and Turner, stirred by their sense of scale and heroic theatricality. Even when tending toward monochromatic, color is always an important part of my work: it is energy, emotion, life, and it brings joy and quickens the blood. Whatever I devise in terms of hue, saturation, and vibrancy must be met with a restraining force or structure, and I increasingly explore processes that set different qualities of color, pigment, and texture against each other, even allowing for and embracing dissonance or jolie laide (“beautiful ugly”).

I do believe that beauty affects not only how we feel but how we behave. I think we’re hardwired to appreciate beauty in music, art and literature; we can learn sophisticated ways to approach beauty, but at the most basic level I think people respond to certain constructs found in nature as reflected in aesthetic fundamentals and classic tropes. As the daughter of an artist, I imbibed the principles of art making and great art at an early age, and yet I am constantly pulled in new directions rather than staying with one style or point of view. Mediated by a desire for freedom, this tension between permanence and flux seems to always play out in my canvases — maybe even cathartically.