"In the process of installing the exhibition Michael Chow aka Zhou Yinghua: Voice for My Father at the Andy Warhol Museum, my thoughts have turned to abstraction with new direction. (Example above left.) Chow works with large-scale abstraction and engages mixed materials, including precious metals, house paint, and even trash. With densely layered surfaces and contrasting textures, Chow's paintings have an intense, almost violent energy. In this competition, the painting Happiness by Barbara Mink caught my attention. Her palette of muted pastels creates a sense of levity that I found fascinating and sophisticated. There was an overall sense of softness and warmth in her canvas, qualities which are not usually used to describe abstraction. The genre of abstract painting has a longstanding, mostly masculine, place within the history of art, and it was refreshing to see a feminine perspective on this tradition. Mink found a balance between color and material that leads to an overall sense of harmony in her work. "

I had never heard of Chow before, and am glad I've been "introduced." In looking at the two images above, and at the work of women who were working during the fifties and sixties heyday of abstract expressionism (Frankenthaler, Krasner) or contemporary colleagues (Melissa Zarem in Ithaca) I don't see palettes, energy or gestures that are terribly from male contemporaries. So it's interesting to think about the framework, both historical and current, within which we view things.

                                                               

Mink Gallery

Working with resin AND raw canvas- www.artresin.com
Sharing space and time with Tom Partigianoni
Luxurious expanse of white walls
Contemporary setting with two of the loveliest art appreciators in Ithaca
One more week left for show with Patty Brown at State of the Art. A great collaboration- not overdone, but I think our colorful, gestural work goes well together.
Winter Journey at CAP for the month of December

06/29/2016

Featured Artist
Memorial Day weekend- balancing work, friends and painting.

Echo Art Fair in Buffalo was a great success- sales, purchases and new friends.

Photo by Cheryl Gorski.

The month of May opens with a great group show at State of the Art Gallery in Ithaca on Friday May 6, then an open studio from 10-3 pm at the Mink Gallery, 614 North Cayuga Street.

 

One week later I'm in Buffalo for the Echo Art Fair at the OSC Manufacturing, 1001 East Delavan in Buffalo NY. The first Echo was held at the old Central Train Station on Buffalo's East Side, then moved to other locations. Now it's back in what promises to be a great setting.

It's such a privilege to have one's work viewed and thoughtfully considered by someone you've never met. Jessica Beck is the Associate Curator of Art at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, and was the judge for the BSA 120th Catalogue Show at the Castellani Museum of Art in Lewiston. I wanted to share what she wrote about this piece, "Happiness", not only because it's so generous, but because it makes me think about what I do in new ways.

 

Feeling the weight of history these days, the untimely death of Cornell's president Beth Garrett, the passing of our son Dan three years ago last month, my mother three years ago this month, my father in June of 2014- feelings of nostalgia, as much as loss, and as I age, the sense of a limited horizon. So why not put some thoughts down?

 

Looking forward to our two month long special event at State of the Art Gallery in ithaca. SOAG artists respond to a poem or poems from regional poets, invited by past Poet Laureate of Tompkins County, Tish PEARLMAN. 

Reception Theory

4/1/2016

"In the process of installing the exhibition Michael Chow aka Zhou Yinghua: Voice for My Father at the Andy Warhol Museum, my thoughts have turned to abstraction with new direction. (Example above left.) Chow works with large-scale abstraction and engages mixed materials, including precious metals, house paint, and even trash. With densely layered surfaces and contrasting textures, Chow's paintings have an intense, almost violent energy. In this competition, the painting Happiness by Barbara Mink caught my attention. Her palette of muted pastels creates a sense of levity that I found fascinating and sophisticated. There was an overall sense of softness and warmth in her canvas, qualities which are not usually used to describe abstraction. The genre of abstract painting has a longstanding, mostly masculine, place within the history of art, and it was refreshing to see a feminine perspective on this tradition. Mink found a balance between color and material that leads to an overall sense of harmony in her work. "

I had never heard of Chow before, and am glad I've been "introduced." In looking at the two images above, and at the work of women who were working during the fifties and sixties heyday of abstract expressionism (Frankenthaler, Krasner) or contemporary colleagues (Melissa Zarem in Ithaca) I don't see palettes, energy or gestures that are terribly from male contemporaries. So it's interesting to think about the framework, both historical and current, within which we view things.