Buffalo Easter Eggs II

A few days ago I posted on a special Buffalo Easter Egg that I came across during a walk in the Elmwood Village. Today I’m posting another Easter Egg in the form of a work of art adhered to the facade of a house. What I especially find interesting about this is that due to COVID-19, there is a dearth of art opportunities at hand. With shuttered galleries and studios, art does not abound as it once did. Therefore, public art has become more important than ever, even a little splash of art such as we see here.

It’s not often that we see a work of art as part of a neighborhood streetscape. Maybe an occasional work on a boarded up window, or atop an easel on a front porch. But to see a painting actually hanging on clapboard? I think it’s pretty neat.

What I love most about coming across this painting (there’s actually another work in the window), is that I was not expecting to see it. The creation drew my eyes to the house, where I also noticed the leaded glass windows, and other architectural details that might have escaped me.

There’s a very humanist element that is to be appreciated. It tells us a lot about the person who lives inside – an art appreciator and an artist him or herself. This is a neighborly action that is not only meant to be shared with people perched on the patio, but passersby as well.

After posting this, the artist Barbara Mink reached out to me to share the following:

I’m a member of the BSA but live and work in Ithaca NY. The “Flying Fish” is a giclée print of the original I had given my brother Symon almost ten years ago, when he and his wife Ellen lived in Buffalo. They then moved to LA for five years, where Symon worked as a first assistant cameraman in “the business”, and they just returned to Buffalo this year.

I was so happy they put the fish outside- our father, Irving Mink, was a well known abstract painter in the region while we were growing up, and we always had a painting on our porch (see inset right). I started painting in 1999 and have carried on the tradition in Ithaca (see inset left). I was very moved by your contextualizing the public display of art in the current Time of Covid: I know people are starving for gatherings, connections, and beauty. Whatever we can do as a community to lighten that burden even a little is so important. But just as important is having people notice and share.

Mink Gallery

A print of a painting done ten years ago finds its way to a Buffalo balcony and the pages of Buffalo Rising
It's been a year of of changes
Do artists have to stay with one style all their lives?
Vibrant colors rather than wintry hues
I've loved having paintings at The Bookery these winter months, but am looking forward to welcoming visitors to The Mink Gallery in March.
The Bookery opens its walls to paintings, and i have the pleasure of getting in there first!
Working with resin AND raw canvas- www.artresin.com
Sharing space and time with Tom Partigianoni
Luxurious expanse of white walls
Contemporary setting with two of the loveliest art appreciators in Ithaca
One more week left for show with Patty Brown at State of the Art. A great collaboration- not overdone, but I think our colorful, gestural work goes well together.
One more week left for show with Patty Brown at State of the Art. A great collaboration- not overdone, but I think our colorful, gestural work goes well together.
Winter Journey at CAP for the month of December

06/29/2016

Featured Artist
Memorial Day weekend- balancing work, friends and painting.

Echo Art Fair in Buffalo was a great success- sales, purchases and new friends.

Photo by Cheryl Gorski.

The month of May opens with a great group show at State of the Art Gallery in Ithaca on Friday May 6, then an open studio from 10-3 pm at the Mink Gallery, 614 North Cayuga Street.

 

One week later I'm in Buffalo for the Echo Art Fair at the OSC Manufacturing, 1001 East Delavan in Buffalo NY. The first Echo was held at the old Central Train Station on Buffalo's East Side, then moved to other locations. Now it's back in what promises to be a great setting.

It's such a privilege to have one's work viewed and thoughtfully considered by someone you've never met. Jessica Beck is the Associate Curator of Art at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, and was the judge for the BSA 120th Catalogue Show at the Castellani Museum of Art in Lewiston. I wanted to share what she wrote about this piece, "Happiness", not only because it's so generous, but because it makes me think about what I do in new ways.

 

Feeling the weight of history these days, the untimely death of Cornell's president Beth Garrett, the passing of our son Dan three years ago last month, my mother three years ago this month, my father in June of 2014- feelings of nostalgia, as much as loss, and as I age, the sense of a limited horizon. So why not put some thoughts down?

 

Looking forward to our two month long special event at State of the Art Gallery in ithaca. SOAG artists respond to a poem or poems from regional poets, invited by past Poet Laureate of Tompkins County, Tish PEARLMAN. 

Easter Eggs in the Summer!

7/13/2020

Buffalo Easter Eggs II

A few days ago I posted on a special Buffalo Easter Egg that I came across during a walk in the Elmwood Village. Today I’m posting another Easter Egg in the form of a work of art adhered to the facade of a house. What I especially find interesting about this is that due to COVID-19, there is a dearth of art opportunities at hand. With shuttered galleries and studios, art does not abound as it once did. Therefore, public art has become more important than ever, even a little splash of art such as we see here.

It’s not often that we see a work of art as part of a neighborhood streetscape. Maybe an occasional work on a boarded up window, or atop an easel on a front porch. But to see a painting actually hanging on clapboard? I think it’s pretty neat.

What I love most about coming across this painting (there’s actually another work in the window), is that I was not expecting to see it. The creation drew my eyes to the house, where I also noticed the leaded glass windows, and other architectural details that might have escaped me.

There’s a very humanist element that is to be appreciated. It tells us a lot about the person who lives inside – an art appreciator and an artist him or herself. This is a neighborly action that is not only meant to be shared with people perched on the patio, but passersby as well.

After posting this, the artist Barbara Mink reached out to me to share the following:

I’m a member of the BSA but live and work in Ithaca NY. The “Flying Fish” is a giclée print of the original I had given my brother Symon almost ten years ago, when he and his wife Ellen lived in Buffalo. They then moved to LA for five years, where Symon worked as a first assistant cameraman in “the business”, and they just returned to Buffalo this year.

I was so happy they put the fish outside- our father, Irving Mink, was a well known abstract painter in the region while we were growing up, and we always had a painting on our porch (see inset right). I started painting in 1999 and have carried on the tradition in Ithaca (see inset left). I was very moved by your contextualizing the public display of art in the current Time of Covid: I know people are starving for gatherings, connections, and beauty. Whatever we can do as a community to lighten that burden even a little is so important. But just as important is having people notice and share.